Did Shakespeare drink at Chaucer's Tabard Inn?

Submitted by ctcamp on Fri, 09/26/2014 - 5:55pm
Image of the Tabard Inn in the 19th c.

You probably know the Tabard Inn as the Southwark drinking establishment from whence Chaucer's pilgrims started their imaginary pilgrimage. The Tabard was a real place -- just off London Bridge on the south bank of the Thames, on the route from London to Kent and Canterbury, and it persisted (in one form or another) until the mid-19th century. And you probably know Southwark as the London suburb, on the south bank across the Thames from the City of London proper, that was home to Elizabethan London's riff-raff: prostitutes, bear-baiting, and commercial theatre.

Maps and Gazetters of Early Modern London

Submitted by ctcamp on Fri, 10/25/2013 - 3:52pm

As a follow-up to the fly-through of early seventeenth-century London, I suggest theĀ Map of Early Modern London, hosted by the University of Victoria and based on the 1560 woodcut map known as the Agas Map. You can view the map image by image, click on designated links to learn more about the different London locales, use the Encyclopedia to locate specific places, read early modern texts that describe or talk about London, and more!

What would John Donne's London have looked like?

Submitted by ctcamp on Fri, 10/25/2013 - 10:01am

What would the streets of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London looked like? What would you have seen as you walked through town? Shopfronts, vistas, church squares? How did vendors display their wares? What were the street surfaces like? Buildings? Wharves down on the river?